Young sculptor from Nagaland wins NE competition

Neivito Vitsu creates a clay model of Prime Minister Narendra Modi with depiction of development at the recently concluded 7th Northeast Youth Festival, 2024 held from February 26-29 in Agartala, Tripura.

Neivito Vitsu creates a clay model of Prime Minister Narendra Modi with depiction of development at the recently concluded 7th Northeast Youth Festival, 2024 held from February 26-29 in Agartala, Tripura.

Morung Express news 
Kohima | March 3

A young sculptor from Nagaland, Neivito Vitsu has won the clay modelling competition at the recently concluded 7th Northeast Youth Festival, 2024 held from February 26-29 in Agartala, Tripura.
Crafting a portrait of the Prime Minister Narendra Modi with depiction of development, made him to stand out among the competitors. 

During the competition, 26-year old Vitsu, hailing from Viswema Village, informed The Morung Express that were three themes to choose from including Save Girl Child, Environmental protection and Development. He chose the third. 

He had travelled with other participants representing the State to compete in various competitions under the aegis of the Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan (NYKS), Nagaland. 

The young artist, who says he venturing into the field in his home state, expressed that it was one great platform to utilise his talent. 

Unlike other creative art forms, Vitsu rues that sculpture is yet to become popular like painting, woodcarvings among others. 

A fine arts graduate, Vitsu says it has been about 7 years that he had been practicing the art by taking up small projects, commission work and training from time to time. 
Some of his major works include creating portrait sculptures in educational institutions. Apart from that, he gives art classes. 

From different forms of raw material he uses to create products, Vitsu said he prefers the use of fibre, which are otherwise not locally sourced but procured from cities like Guwahati. 

Vitsu opines that fine arts, although having wide scope if pursued professionally, is still yet be offered as professional courses in both government or private institutions. 

He adds that many techniques that he learned during his fine arts courses were inherent to the techniques practiced by our own forefathers who had inborn talents on this kind of arts.  
Vitsu hopes that opening a studio, and garnering support and encouragement on the art will further widen his horizon and give him opportunities to explore his professional skills.