Health

  • Breast milk may prevent heart disease in preterm babies
    London, November 29 (IANS) Researchers have found that early use of breast milk could play a vital role in preventing heart disease in prematurely born infants. One of the long-term health complications that young adults born prematurely may have is unique heart characteristics. These can include smaller heart chambers, relatively higher blood pressure, and a disproportionate increase in muscle mass in the heart. "The current evidence comes from observational studies and highl
  • Minimal exposure to air pollution leading to hospitalisation
    New York, November 28 (IANS) Health related problems linked to air pollution could be far higher than previously thought, as researchers have found that short term exposure to fine particulate matter in the air (known as PM2.5) is associated with several newly identified causes of hospital admissions, even at levels below international air quality guidelines. Air pollution has for the first time been linked life-threatening illnesses - including sepsis, kidney failure and urinary tr
  • Over 300 children die everyday from AIDS-related causes
    United Nations, November 27 (IANS): Some 320 children and adolescents died every day from AIDS-related causes in 2018, or 13 every hour, according to a global snapshot on children, HIV and AIDS released by the UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) on Tuesday.   Low access to antiretroviral treatment, in addition to limited prevention efforts, is a leading cause for these deaths, with only 54 per cent of children aged 0-14 living with HIV in 2018 - or 7,90,
  • Drinking coffee may reduce heart disease risk
    London, November 27 (IANS): Coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Mets), say researchers adding that MetS increases the risk of cardiovascular problems, including coronary heart disease and stroke. According the study, Assistant Professor Giuseppe Grosso from the University of Catania, Italy, reviewed his own scientific research on the association between coffee consumption and MetS in Polish and Italian cohorts and explored the potential
  • Lemon water for healthier you
    New Delhi, November 27 (IANSlife) While lemon water is popular as an easy weight-loss remedy, it can also set right the course of your bodily functions, if taken the correct way.   Lifestyle coach Luke Coutinho, and ''Bahubali'' actress Anushka Shetty in their 2019 book, ''The Magic Weight Loss Pill'', spell the transformational power of this simple beverage.   Rich in Vitamins C and B, riboflavin, and minerals such as calcium, phosphorus and magnesium, lemon
  • Infants spending too much time on screen: Study
    New York, November 26 (IANS) Researchers have found that the amount of time children are spending each day watching television or using a computer or mobile device is increasing at an alarming rate. The study, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, found that children's daily screen time increased from 53 minutes at age 12 months to more than 150 minutes at 3 years old. According to the researchers, by age 8, children in US were more likely to log the highest amount of screen
  • Air pollution can cause blindness: Study
    Photo: IANS   London, November 26 (IANS) Living in a more polluted area is associated with a greater likelihood of having glaucoma, a debilitating eye condition that can cause blindness, says a new study. The findings, published in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, found that people in neighbourhoods with higher amounts of fine particulate matter pollution were at least six per cent more likely to report having glaucoma than those in the least-
  • Obesity can cause brain damage, says study
    New York, November 26 (IANS) While obesity is primarily associated with weight gain, a new study suggests it triggers inflammation in the nervous system that could damage important regions of the brain. Developments in MRI, like diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a technique that tracks the diffusion of water along the brain's signal-carrying white matter tracts, have enabled researchers to study this damage directly. "Brain changes were found in obese adolescents related to regions
  • High-fat diet may increase colon cancer risk
    New York, November 25 (IANS) Two genes that appear to help stem cells in the intestine burn dietary fat may play a role in colon cancer, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, described a new connection between the way cells consume fat and how genes regulate stem cell behaviour in the intestines of mice. "This is important because scientists have shown that when there's too much dietary fat in the intestine, stem cell numbers increase, bo
  • High-fat diet may increase colon cancer risk
    New York, November 25 (IANS): Two genes that appear to help stem cells in the intestine burn dietary fat may play a role in colon cancer, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, described a new connection between the way cells consume fat and how genes regulate stem cell behaviour in the intestines of mice. "This is important because scientists have shown that when there's too much dietary fat in the intestine, stem cell number
  • Wound healing in mucous tissues might prevent AIDS
    Washington, November 25 (IANS) Wound healing events in mucous tissues during early infection by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus, or SIV, guard some primate species against developing AIDS, a new study has learned. The research, published in the journal Nature Communications, looked at why certain species can carry the virus throughout their lives, and still avoid disease progression. SIV is closely related to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). It is used as a laboratory model
  • Shaking head to remove water from ears causes brain damage
    New York, November 24 (IANS): Shaking head is one of the most common methods people use to get rid of water in their ears, but it can can also cause complications as researchers have found that trapped water in the ear canals can cause infection and brain damage.   Researchers at Cornell University and Virginia Tech in US, revealed that shaking the head to free trapped water can cause brain damage in small children.   "Our research mainly focuses on the accelerati
  • Obesity, smoking have negative impact on bone health: Study
    New York, Novèmber 24 (IANS) Both obesity and smoking can have negative effects on bone health, say researchers, adding they also impact healing in patients who have undergone surgery for fractures of the wrist, or the distal radius, among the most common bone fractures. "Obesity and smoking are currently considered among the two most important preventable causes of poor health in developed nations, and both are modifiable risk factors," said senior author Tamara D. Rozental from H
  • Cancer patients at doubled risk of dying from stroke: Study
    New York, November 24 (IANS) People living with cancer are more than twice as likely to die of a stroke, compared to the general population say researchers, adding that the risk increases with time. Cancers of the breast, prostate or colorectum were the type most commonly associated with fatal stroke, said the study published in the journal Nature Communications. According the researchers, previous research has shown that most cancer patients aren't going to die of their cancer,
  • AI to determine if immunotherapy is working in lung cancer
    New York, November 23 (IANS) Scientists who have pioneered the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to predict whether chemotherapy will be successful, can now determine which lung-cancer patients will benefit from expensive immunotherapy. Researchers used AI to find previously unseen changes in patterns in CT scans taken when the lung cancer is first diagnosed compared to scans taken after the first 2-3 cycles of immunotherapy treatment. And, as with previous work, those changes
  • More than 80% adolescents worldwide not physically active: WHO
    Geneva, November 22 (IANS): More than 80 per cent of adolescents worldwide are not physically active, including 85 per cent girls and 78 per cent boys, putting their health at risk by not doing regular exercise and spending too much time on screen, according to a new study from World Health Organization (WHO).   The study, published in the journal The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, based on data reported by 1.6 million 11 to 17-year-old students - found that acro
  • More than 80% adolescents worldwide not physically active: WHO
    Geneva, November 22 (IANS) More than 80 per cent of adolescents worldwide are not physically active, including 85 per cent girls and 78 per cent boys, putting their health at risk by not doing regular exercise and spending too much time on screen, according to a new study from World Health Organization (WHO). The study, published in the journal The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, based on data reported by 1.6 million 11 to 17-year-old students - found that across all 146 count
  • Why poor people are more prone to heart disease
    Bern, November 22 (IANS) Insufficient sleep is one reason why poor people are more prone to heart disease, researchers have warned. People with lower socioeconomic status sleep less for a variety of reasons: they may do several jobs, work in shifts, live in noisy environments, and have greater levels of emotional and financial stress, according to the study published in the journal Cardiovascular Research. The study found that short sleep explained 13.4 per cent of the link betwe
  • How sleep deprivation affects your performance
    New York, November 22 (IANS) Sleep deprivation affects us much more than prior theories have suggested, say researchers, adding that it impacts placekeeping - or, the ability to complete a series of steps without losing one's place, despite potential interruptions. "Our research showed that sleep deprivation doubles the odds of making placekeeping errors and triples the number of lapses in attention, which is startling," said study researcher Kimberly Fenn from Michigan State Univer
  • Air pollution can trigger Alzheimer's in aged women
    New York, November 22 (IANS) Women in their 70s and 80s who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution experienced greater declines in memory and more Alzheimer's-like brain atrophy than their counterparts who breathed cleaner air, new research has revealed. "This is the first study to really show, in a statistical model, that air pollution was associated with changes in people's brains and that those changes were then connected with declines in memory performance," said study r