Infocus

  • Lockdown or Community Policing?
    Angamimiapfü Mechü Krotho  Kohima   Reflections on the spread of the Corona Virus within Kohima   COVID-19 cases are rising steadily with no deaths reported. There has been no evidence of explosive spread or cases reported in clusters in the community. Positive cases amongst the community are in isolated incidence. There is a palpable panic reaction and apprehension amongst the public. Signs of Local transmission are present. Are we on the verge
  • Problems & Solution of traffic congestion vis-a-vis Even/Odd numbers
    Lanuzulu Aier Dimapur Of late, several opinions has been shared in the media appreciating for implementation of Even/Odd numbers of vehicles running in Dimapur jurisdiction to ease the traffic congestion which was later on followed by the Kohima traffic that relieved the vehicle owners from heavy traffic congestion, parking problem and time consumption. And I too convey my gratitude to the concerned authorities for taken up such a measure which reduced the traffic congestion to
  • Today in History July 14
    Reuters 1904 - Paul Kruger, South African politician, died in exile in Switzerland. He led the Transvaal during the 1899-1902 Boer War against Britain, which was seeking to extend its commercial interests after the discovery of gold. 1933 - The Nazi Party under Adolf Hitler banned all opposition parties in Germany. 1935 - Bastille Day in Paris. 1965 - Adlai Stevenson, twice Democratic candidate for the U.S. presidency who lost to Dwight Eisenhower in 1952 and 1956, died in
  • TODAY in HISTORY: July 14
    Following are some of the major events to have occurred on July 14   1430: Joan of Arc, taken prisoner by the Burgundians in May, is handed over to Pierre Cauchon, the bishop of Beauvais.   1536: France and Portugal sign the Treaty of Lyons, aligning themselves against Spain.   1789: The Bastille, a fortress in Paris used to hold political prisoners, is stormed by a mob.   1798: The Sedition Act is passed by the U.S. Congress.   18
  • To Forgive, but not Forget
    Understanding the Tuensang Fiasco from a Psychosocial Approach   S Temjen Imchen Jorhat    Hearing of a statement like we are “forgiving but not forgetting” is a paradox, or contradiction. ‘Forgiven, but not forgotten’ is either a conditional or unusual utterance. We hardly get to hear of such words in ordinary social life settings, but such a statement is a reaction that usually comes from an aggrieved party in which the news informa
  • Today in History July 12
    Reuters 1906 - French artillery officer Alfred Dreyfus, who was falsely accused of treason, was finally pardoned and restored to his rank and regiment. 1920 - The Panama Canal was formally opened, six years after the first ship sailed through it. 1970 - China agreed to make an extensive loan to Tanzania and Zambia to build the Tanzam railway linking the two countries. 1995 - Morocco's Hicham El Guerrouj breaks 1,500m world record with a run of three minutes, 26 seconds.
  • Today in History July 10
    Reuters 1940 - The Battle of Britain began in World War Two when at least 70 German bombers attacked docks in south Wales. 1943 - Allied invasion of Sicily in World War Two. 1985 - One Greenpeace crew member died when the Greenpeace ship Rainbow Warrior was blown up and sunk by French secret agents in Auckland harbour in New Zealand. 1991 - Boris Yeltsin was sworn in as the first elected president of Russia. 1995 - Actor Hugh Grant makes first public appearance after arr
  • Today in History July 11
    Reuters 1935 - The French army officer Alfred Dreyfus died. Dreyfus, who was Jewish, was convicted on a false charge of treason in 1894 and his case became the centre of a controversy that divided French society for decades. 1937 - The American composer George Gershwin died. Famed for his "Rhapsody in Blue" and "An American in Paris", he also wrote many popular songs as well as the opera "Porgy and Bess". 1940 - Marshal Henri Petain was declared H
  • Today in History July 9
    Reuters 1900 - Commonwealth of Australia founded. 1932 - King Camp Gillette, U.S. inventor and manufacturer of the safety razor, died. 1993 - British scientists using genetic fingerprinting identified the bones of the Russian Tsar Nicholas II and members of his family, executed by Bolsheviks at Yekaterinburg in 1918. 1997 - The American heavyweight Mike Tyson was banned from boxing for a year and fined $3 million for biting opponent Evander Holyfield's ear during a worl
  • Today in History July 8
    Reuters 1937 - Non-aggression treaty signed between Iran, Afghanistan, Iraq and Turkey. 1943 - Jean Moulin, hero of the French resistance, died. Known as "Max", he coordinated resistance in occupied France but was captured and tortured by the Gestapo and died of his injuries. 1967 - Vivien Leigh, British actress of stage and screen, died; best known for her role in the film "Gone with the Wind". 1976 - Former U.S. president Richard Nixon was disbarred by
  • Today in History July 7
    Reuters 1898 - U.S. annexation of Hawaii. 1930 - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author and creator of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, died. 1981 - U.S. President Ronald Reagan nominated Sandra Day O'Connor to the Supreme Court; she became its first woman member in September that year. 1994 - Northern Yemeni forces gained total control of their southern foes' last bastion, Aden, crushing a bid to recreate an independent state. 1998 - Moshood Abiola, Nigeria'
  • Today in History July 6
    Reuters 1919 - The first airship to cross the Atlantic, the British R-34, arrived in New York. 1942 - Diarist Anne Frank and her family took refuge from the Nazis in Amsterdam. 1962 - William Faulkner, U.S. novelist and Nobel Prize winner, died. 1967 - Civil war erupted in Nigeria over Biafran independence. 1971 - Louis Armstrong, jazz musician, died. His groups, the Hot Five and the Hot Seven, from 1925 to 1927, had a revolutionary impact on jazz. 1994 - Israeli Prim
  • Today in History July 5
    Reuters 1945 - U.S. General Douglas MacArthur announced the liberation of the whole of the Philippines in World War Two. 1945 - John Curtin, prime minister of Australia during most of World War Two, died. 1948 - The state-run National Health Service came into being in Britain. 1975 - Arthur Ashe beat fellow American Jimmy Connors to become the first black tennis player to win the Wimbledon men's singles title. 1989 - Former White House aide Oliver North was fined $15
  • Today in History July 5
    Reuters 1945 - U.S. General Douglas MacArthur announced the liberation of the whole of the Philippines in World War Two. 1945 - John Curtin, prime minister of Australia during most of World War Two, died. 1948 - The state-run National Health Service came into being in Britain. 1975 - Arthur Ashe beat fellow American Jimmy Connors to become the first black tennis player to win the Wimbledon men's singles title. 1989 - Former White House aide Oliver North was fined $15
  • Today in History July 4
    Reuters 1918 - New Sultan of Turkey proclaimed at Constantinople. 1934 - Marie Curie, Polish-French physicist and Nobel Prize winner, died. 1943 - Wladyslaw Sikorski, Polish statesman and prime minister, was killed in an air crash. He led Poland's government in exile during World War Two. 1946 - Philippines gained independence from United States. 1976 - Israel launched a commando raid on Entebbe airport in Uganda to rescue 102 hostages held by Arab and West German hi
  • Today in History July 3
    Reuters 1904 - Theodor Herzl, Hungarian-born Zionist leader, died. In 1897 he became first president of the World Zionist Organisation. 1928 - John Logie Baird transmitted the world's first colour television pictures in London. 1940 - British ships destroyed the French fleet at Oran and Mers-el-Kebir in Algeria to prevent them falling into enemy hands. Over 1,000 French sailors died. 1962 - President de Gaulle of France declared Algeria independent. 1971 - Jim Morris
  • Today in History July 2
    Reuters 1915 - Porfirio Diaz, Mexican soldier and president from 1877-1911, died in Paris. 1937 - Amelia Earhart and co-pilot Fred Noonan disappeared over the Pacific while trying to fly around the world. 1961 - Ernest Hemingway, the American novelist best known for "A Farewell to Arms" and "For Whom the Bell Tolls", shot himself. 1964 - U.S. President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act, prohibiting racial discrimination. 1973 - The American a
  • Today in History July 1
    Reuters 1916 - British and French forces launched the Somme Offensive in World War One. 1917 - 50th anniversary of Confederation of Canada. 1942 - Sevastopol in Crimea fell to German forces after an eight-month siege. 1946 - The United States tested an atomic bomb over Bikini Atoll in the Pacific. 1974 - Juan Peron, Argentine president and founder of the Peronist movement, died. 1997 - Robert Mitchum, U.S. movie star in films including "Cape Fear", "Rya
  • TODAY IN HISTORY - June 26
     Reuters Following are some of the major events to have occurred on June 26: 1945 - The United Nations Charter was signed by 50 nations in San Francisco, creating a successor to the League of Nations. It became effective on October 24. 1960 - British Somaliland became independent. Five days later it merged with Italian Somaliland to become the Somali Republic. 1988 - Air France Airbus A320 crashes near Mulhouse, France. 1996 - Afghan guerrilla leader Gulbuddin Hekma
  • TODAY IN HISTORY - June 25
    Reuters Following are some of the major events to have occurred on June 25: 1950 - North Korea invaded South Korea, heralding the beginning of the Korean War. 1975 - Mozambique became independent and Samora Machel was sworn in as president after 477 years of Portuguese rule. 1991 - Croatia and Slovenia declared independence from Yugoslavia, plunging the federation into a violent breakup. 1996 - A bomb blast tore through a Saudi Arabian military complex housing foreigners